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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several key guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal, and would then be eligible for work authorization. Deferred action is a discretionary determination to defer removal action of an individual as an act of prosecutorial discretion. Deferred action does not provide an individual with lawful status.

Does this process apply to me if I am currently in removal proceedings, have a final removal order, or have a voluntary departure order?

This process is open to any individual who can demonstrate he or she meets the guidelines for consideration, including those who are in removal proceedings, with a final order, or with a voluntary departure order. All deferred action decisions will be made by USCIS.

If you are currently in immigration detention

If you are currently in immigration detention and believe you meet the guidelines for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), you must:

  • Identify yourself to your case officer explaining you believe you are DACA eligible. Your case officer will review your case along with the local Office of the Chief Counsel. If you appear to meet the DACA requirements, you may be released on an alternative form of supervision to allow you to pursue your case with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
    • If your case officer is unavailable, you can contact the ICE Detention Reporting and Information Line at 1-888-351-4024 (staffed 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., Monday – Friday); or submit an email to ERO.INFO@ice.dhs.gov and the appropriate action will be taken in a timely manner.

If you are not in immigration detention

If you are not in immigration detention and want to affirmatively request consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals, you must submit your request to USCIS – not ICE – pursuant to these procedures established by USCIS.