Module 3:    Maintaining Active Student Records


Introduction


The previous module outlined how a prospective student applies for admission at a school and eventually arrives on campus to enroll in a program of study. Once in the United States, nonimmigrant students must comply with certain requirements in order to maintain F-1 or M-1 status. Module 3 addresses these terms and conditions.

 

  Maintaining Status: Complying with the F-1 and M-1 regulatory requirements in 8 CFR 214.2 is referred to as maintaining status.

  Out of Status: Students who fail to meet any of the regulatory requirements are potentially out of status.

 

For example, if a student does not enroll in a full course of study, the student has failed to meet a regulatory requirement and is potentially out of status. This is just one of many situations that can impact a student's status.

You must closely monitor the nonimmigrant students enrolled at your school to ensure they comply with regulatory requirements. When a student’s information changes, update the student’s SEVIS record accordingly.

 

In some cases, a student may be permitted exceptions to normal maintenance of status requirements. For example, under certain circumstances, a student may receive authorization for a reduced course load (RCL). Or, a student who has fallen out of status may apply for reinstatement. Module 3 discusses such exceptions.

 

There are four lessons:

 

  Lesson 1: Standard Maintenance

  Lesson 2: Program Length Extensions and Reductions

  Lesson 3: Leaving and Reentering the United States

  Lesson 4: Loss of Status and Reinstatements

Lesson 1:  Standard Maintenance


Introduction


This lesson covers routine SEVIS reporting requirements for continuing students. It defines full course of study and how to handle situations where a student needs to enroll in less than a full course of study.

Topic 1: Full-time Enrollment


Typically, nonimmigrant students must enroll in a full course of study each session in order to maintain status. However, there are certain exceptions that allow students to drop below a full course of study: academic difficulties, medical conditions and completion of a course of study. This topic provides information on full course of study requirements and the exceptions to those requirements.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Advise F-1 and M-1 students on full course of study requirements

  Advise students on authorizations for a reduced course load

  Authorize a reduced course load

Definition of Full Course of Study

 

The regulations define a full course of study as follows:

 

F-1 Students:

 

  Undergraduate studies — 12 credit hours per session

  English language programs — 18 clock hours per week if the dominant part of the course of study consists of classroom instruction, or at least 22 clock hours a week if the dominant part of the course of study consists of laboratory work

  Post graduate studies and seminaries — as certified by the DSO as a full course of study

  Elementary and secondary schools — as certified by the DSO to consist of class attendance for not less than the minimum number of hours a week prescribed for normal progress toward graduation

  Courses can be taken at other SEVP-certified schools and count toward the full course of study requirements if the SEVP-certified school that enrolled the student accepts the transfer credits as contributing to the student’s program of study

 

M-1 Students:

 

  18 to 22 clock hours per week

The regulations limit the number of online and distance-learning courses that nonimmigrant students can count toward their full course of study requirements. The rules are as follows:

 

F-1 Students:

 

  Students may count no more than the equivalent of one class, or three credits, of online or distance-learning courses per session toward the full course of study.

  Students enrolled in English language programs may not count any online or distance-learning courses toward their full course of study requirement.

  If students only need one course to complete their program of study, the course cannot be completed through online or distance education.

 

M-1 Students:

 

  Students may not count any online or distance-learning courses toward their full course of study requirement.

 

These restrictions apply only to the number of credit hours required to meet a student’s full course of study requirements. As long as students meet these requirements, they may enroll in additional online or distance-learning courses, as desired.

Authorizations for a Reduced Course Load

 

There are three circumstances where you can authorize an F-1 student to take less than a full course of study:

 

  Academic difficulties

  Medical conditions

  Completion of a course of study

 

M-1 students can only drop below a full course of study due to a medical condition.

 

In order for a student to obtain authorization to drop below a full course of study, he or she must first receive permission. You must follow regulatory requirements to grant the authorization and record the authorization in SEVIS.

Guidelines to Drop Below a Full Course of Study for Academic Reasons

 

You may authorize a RCL for F-1 students for academic reasons in the following situations:

 

  Initial difficulty with the English language or reading requirements

  Unfamiliarity with U.S. teaching methods

  Improper course level placement

 

Authorization for a reduced course load due to academic difficulties is limited to one term at each program level.

 

A RCL must consist of at least six credit hours or half of the minimum requirement for a full course of study for the program for which the student is enrolled. To maintain status, students must resume a full course of study in the next regular session.

 

An authorization to drop below a full course load for academic reasons does not impact a student’s eligibility to take a reduced course load for medical reasons.

Guidelines to Drop Below a Full Course of Study for Medical Conditions

 

F-1 students with documented medical conditions can take a reduced course load or no course load at all. A student must provide you with medical documentation, which you should maintain in the student’s file. The documentation must be from a licensed medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy or licensed clinical psychologist in order for you to authorize a reduced course load.

 

As the DSO, you do not have to concur with the medical reason. You must document the reason and then ensure that the student does not exceed the authorized amount of time at less than a full course load. The authorization period cannot exceed an aggregate of 12 months per program level. This means a student who dropped to half time for one semester in freshman year can drop to half time again for one semester in junior year, if needed.

 

However, if the student has already had 12 months at less than full-course load, the student is not allowed any additional part-time study based on a medical condition until advancing to the next program level.

 

Authorization for one term or reduced course load session does not automatically carry over to the next. You must re-authorize the exception in SEVIS every term or session, if warranted.

 

M-1 students with a documented medical condition can drop below a full course load or interrupt their studies with the same type of documentation as required for F-1 students. However, M-1 students are limited to an aggregate of five months of reduced course load.

Guidelines to Drop Below a Full Course of Study for Completion of a Course of Study

 

In some cases, F-1 students in their final term do not need a full course load in order to have enough credits to graduate. In these cases, students can take just the courses needed to complete their program.

 

Students authorized by the school for a partial course load in their final session are automatically considered full-time students. SEVIS authorization is optional (there is functionality in SEVIS but recording a partial course load in the final semester is not required).

 

If a student fails a course during the last term consisting of a reduced course load, the student may again have a final session with less than a full course load. A second consecutive authorization for a reduced course load in a student’s final semester should be reported in SEVIS in order to ensure that the student is continuing to make progress toward program completion. Carefully document the circumstances so you can show that the student continued to make normal progress toward program completion.

 

If a student does not finish the program of study after a second final term or session with a reduced course load, the student is not eligible for a third reduced course load.


Updating SEVIS with Reduced Course Load Information

 

Use the Authorize to Drop Below Full Course Load function on the Student Information page to report authorized reductions in course load.

 

  Select the reason for authorizing the reduced course load from the drop down list

  Enter the start date and end date of the authorization

  Review your entries to be certain they are correct and press the authorize button

 

If a student reduces or drops below a full course of study without authorization, you must report the violation within 21 days after the violation occurs. Violations include:

 

  Failure to enroll in a full course load at the beginning of a session

  Dropping below a full course load during a session without your permission


In either of these cases, terminate the student’s SEVIS record; indicate the reason as Unauthorized Drop Below Full Course of Study. Let the student know that he or she is potentially out of status (the student may choose to reinstate status). Students who decide not to reinstate status must depart the United States immediately. There is no grace period.

 

To update SEVIS in the next session in which the student returns to a full course of study, you should register the student’s record in SEVIS within 30 days of the next session start date, and verify full-time enrollment within 30 days of the close of the class registration period. This will meet the regulatory requirements for showing that a student has resumed a full course of study.

Topic 2: Continuing Enrollment


Introduction

 

Either F-1 or M-1 status allows a prospective nonimmigrant student to enter the United States to study. Once admitted, a nonimmigrant student must take certain steps to maintain his or her nonimmigrant status including enrolling in a full course of study for each required session. Required sessions do not include breaks such as holidays, semester breaks, or summer recess.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Understand requirements for registering continuing students

  Register continuing students in SEVIS

The next session start date is an important data element in SEVIS. You entered this date when initially registering a student. SEVIS uses this date to generate alerts. These alerts, Active Students Requiring Registration, notify you that the student is expected to re-enroll for the coming session. Within 30 days of the next session start date, you need to confirm that the student is enrolled in classes at your institution and register that student in SEVIS with new session dates.

 

Do not register students for one session that begins with the program start date and ends with the program end date within that session unless the program is less than one academic year and the student is expected to be in classes when the rest of the school is on break.

The registration screen for a new session asks for the same information you provided when you first registered the student and activated the SEVIS record. The information requested includes:

 

  Current session end date

  Next session start date

  Address information

  Passport information
Best Management Practice:

It is a good practice to ask a student for change of address information and to check/verify the passport information. If the student’s passport is within six months of expiration, suggest that he or she renew it. This will prevent problems if the student needs to travel unexpectedly.

The primary challenge in registering students in SEVIS each term is determining if a student has actually enrolled in a full course of study. The process for doing this varies with each school. If your school does not have an automated process for verifying enrollment, SEVP strongly recommends that you require students to visit your office before you update their SEVIS record.

 

Repeat this process at the beginning of each session, until the student completes the program. If the student is in the last session of his/her program, check the box on the registration page indicating this and leave the next session start date blank.

If the student does not enroll in the next session, you must terminate the student’s SEVIS record for Failure to Enroll within 30 days of the next session start date.

Lesson 2:  Program Length Extensions and Reductions


Introduction


Nonimmigrant students must maintain status and continually progress toward the completion of their program of study. The previous lesson established that in order to maintain status, nonimmigrant students must report to their DSO at the beginning of every regular term (other than holiday and summer terms). This lesson covers information on program end dates and how to reduce or lengthen a program of study.

Topic 1: Program End Dates


Introduction

 

When you create an Initial record in SEVIS, one of the required pieces of information is the program end date. The program end date requirements differ for F-1 and M-1 students.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Understand how to determine the proper program end date

  Understand the differences between F-1 and M-1 program lengths

The program end date for F-1 students is based on the average time it takes all students to complete a particular program of study. For example, the normal length of study for a Bachelor of Arts degree is four years. The program end date is the date on which students are expected to accomplish their educational objective — most often this means graduating and receiving a degree.

 

An individual student may take more or less time than the average student to complete a program. Consequently, you are able to change an F-1 student's program end date at any time, making the duration of the program either shorter or longer.

 

M-1 students, by law, are only authorized to participate in programs of study lasting three years, even though they are permitted to enter the United States for a duration of one year. When creating the initial M-1 student Form I-20, the student’s program end date must be entered as a date that is exactly one year after the program start date, unless the program of study is less than one year. For programs that last less than one year, enter the actual program end date.. (We will discuss later extensions to the M-1 program of study to accommodate those programs lasting more than one year.)

F-1 students are permitted to remain in the United States to prepare for departure for 60 days after their program end date, or 60 days after any approved period of post-completion OPT. M-1 students are permitted to remain in the United States for 30 days after their program end date and any additionally granted period of post-completion OPT. F-1 students may choose to change their level of study during this time and remain in the United States for duration of status. M-1 students must depart after the period of time and must obtain a new Form I-20 to start any new program of study.

 

The process for extending or reducing the program length varies depending on the student’s nonimmigrant status. The next two topics explain program length changes for F-1 and M-1 students.

Topic 2: F-1 Program Length Changes


You are able to grant a program extension for an F-1 student who is unable to meet the program end date listed on the Form I-20. However, only the PDSO can extend the program if the program end date has passed. If the program end date has passed, a PDSO can change the program end date within 15 days of the current program end date.  Likewise, the program length can also be reduced if an F-1 student finishes ahead of schedule. Neither action requires DHS adjudication.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Advise F-1 students on program extensions and reductions

  Extend or reduce the program of an F-1 student

F-1 Program Length Extensions

 

You can only extend an F-1 student’s program end date if the student has continually maintained status and the delay is caused by compelling academic or medical reasons such as:

 

  Change of major or research topic

  Unexpected research problems

  Documented illness

 

Delays caused by academic probation or suspension are not acceptable reasons for a program extension.

 

You grant an F-1 student an extension in a SEVIS record by choosing the Extend Program option. This will allow you to change the Program End Date to a later date. You must also explain the medical or academic reason for the change. Nonimmigrant students should be held to the school’s published academic requirements for grades and should be making normal progress toward a degree.

You can extend a student’s program length at any time before the current program end date. However, you cannot change it if the program end date has passed. If there is any possibility that the student will not complete on time, extend the program end date. You can always shorten the program length later if the student does not need the extra time.

 

When students register for their last term, please warn them to let you know prior to the current program end date if there is any chance they might fail a course or receive an incomplete. If a student notifies you of a problem, extend the program end date immediately. This gives the student time to resolve grade issues and register for another term if needed. SEVIS will automatically complete the student’s record 60 days after the program end date. If the student does not complete their coursework on time and you have not extended the program end date, the student will need to reinstate.

 

Best Management Practice:

It is a good practice to verify the program end date with the student each new term.

F-1 Program Length Reductions

 

You can reduce the length of a student's program of study when a student completes a program earlier than expected. Choose the Shorten Program option. Enter the new program end date. You have the option of adding remarks to note the reason behind the program length reduction.

Topic 3: M-1 Program Length Changes


There are two primary differences between program extensions for M-1 students and those for F-1 students:

 

  M-1 students are limited to a one year duration of status

  M-1 program extensions require USCIS adjudication, while F-1 program extensions do not

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Extend the program end date of an M-1 student in SEVIS

  Advise M-1 students on the program extension process

M-1 Program Length Extensions

 

While an M-1 student can only be admitted for a period of up to one year, the M-1 program of study can be extended for up to three years — for a second year before the end of the first year; then for a third year (before the end of the second year). If an M-1 student needs to enroll for more than one year, you must recommend the program extension at the appropriate time. You can do this only up to 60 days, and no later than 15 days, prior to the student’s current program end date. In fact, the link in SEVIS that allows you to recommend extension of an M-1 program appears in the student’s record only during this time frame.

 

When available, choose the Extend Program link. The program extension is limited to one year and must reflect the actual end of the one-year duration. Choosing the link allows you to recommend a program extension, however only USCIS can approve the program extension. For example, if a student is enrolled in a three-year program, you will have to recommend two program extensions for that student’s course of study.

Adjudication Requirements

 

M-1 extensions require adjudication by USCIS. When you change the program end date on an M-1 student SEVIS record, you must also:

 

  Print and sign an updated Form I-20

  Give the new Form I-20 to the student

  Instruct the student to:

Sign the Form I-20

- File a Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status with USCIS at least 15 days but not more than 60 days before the program end date on the student’s Form I-20.

 

Once the application for program extension has been properly filed with USCIS, students remain in status while it is pending, even if the original program end date has passed. Students must continue to attend school and maintain full-time enrollment while the application is pending.

 

Best Management Practice:

You should strongly encourage students to send these documents by registered mail with receipt requested or by a courier service that allows package tracking. Students also have the option of filing Form I-539 electronically using the USCIS e-filing option. For filing information, see the Forms section of the USCIS Web site at http://www.uscis.gov.


Adjudication Process

 

After the student sends the request for extension to USCIS, the USCIS adjudicator will either approve or deny the application.

 

If the USCIS adjudicator approves the application, the following occurs:

 

  The student’s SEVIS record is electronically updated to:

Indicate the request for extension was approved

Reflect the new program end date

  There will be a Service Center Adjudication Results alert in SEVIS.

  The student receives a:

Form I-20 with the Service Center's approval stamp

- Notice of Approval with a new I-94 from USCIS[CN[

 

If the USCIS adjudicator denies the application, the following occurs:

 

  The student’s SEVIS record is electronically updated to show that the request for extension was denied

  The student’s SEVIS record automatically terminates for the reason of Extension Denied

  A Service Center Adjudication Results alert appears in SEVIS

  The student receives a Notice of Denial from USCIS

 

If the program extension is denied, the student must depart the United States immediately.

 

M-1 Program Length Reductions

 

To reduce an M-1 student’s program of study, choose the Shorten Program option and enter the new program end date. Reducing the program length too much may require extending the program later through the same requirements as above, including the student filing a Form I-539 application with the appropriate fee.

Lesson 3:  Leaving and Reentering the United States


Introduction


Many nonimmigrant students study in the United States for several years, so periodic trips abroad are common. In addition, students may travel outside of the United States for vacations, work or study abroad.

 

The first topic in this Lesson describes the procedures for a continuing student with a SEVIS record in Active status to travel outside of the United States. The second topic discusses travel under special circumstances, such as when a student's request for extension is pending or when there is a pending request for OPT.

Topic 1: International Travel For Continuing Students

This topic covers restrictions on international travel for continuing F-1 and M-1 nonimmigrant students.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Understand what documentation continuing students need to travel outside of the United States

  Understand when a continuing student can travel outside of the United States

Regulations allow continuing nonimmigrant students in valid status to travel outside of the United States and reenter without jeopardizing their nonimmigrant status. The only restrictions on such travel are as follows:

 

  The student needs a Form I-20 with current information that is signed by a DSO on pages one and three allowing travel outside of the United States

  The student's visa (if applicable) and passport must still be valid at the time the student reenters the United States (unless the student has taken a trip of less than 30 days to Canada, Mexico or contiguous islands)

  A student cannot reenter the country during the grace period granted after completing a program of study

Topic 2: International Travel Under Special Circumstances


There are certain special circumstances that can impact a nonimmigrant student’s ability to travel outside of the United States. This topic examines travel abroad under special circumstances and the impact travel abroad can have on an application that is pending with USCIS.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Advise students on travel with OPT pending

  Advise students on the impact of travel on an application pending with USCIS

  Understand how special circumstances can affect nonimmigrant student travel

Optional Practical Training Pending

 

The guidelines for F-1 and M-1 students differ:

 

  F-1 students may leave and reenter the United States while an approval for OPT is pending. An F-1 student with an expired visa should wait for OPT approval to travel if a valid visa is required for reentry. The Department of State will not issue a visa to an applicant with a pending OPT application.

  M-1 students may not leave the United States while an OPT application is pending without jeopardizing their status. M-1 students are required to wait for OPT approval.

 

If any student travels abroad after receiving approval for OPT, he or she must carry a valid F-1 or M-1 visa stamp (other than citizens of visa exempt countries), Form I-20 signed within the past six months, valid passport, EAD and letter from his or her employer.

Petition Abandonment

 

In certain situations, students are considered to have abandoned any petitions filed with USCIS if they leave the country while they are pending. These situations include pending I-539 applications for:

 

  Changes of status to F-1 or M-1, or from F-1 or M-1 status to any other nonimmigrant status

  Requests for program extensions by M-1 students

  Requests for transfers by M-1 students

 

Travel is not recommended in these situations. If a student must travel while an application is pending, he or she may ask for a new Initial Form I-20 and apply for an F-1 or M-1 visa at the United States embassy or consulate, if necessary, and apply for reentry (not recommended for those awaiting approval of OPT applications). See the Travel and Reentry FAQ on the SEVP Web site for more information.

 

An F-1 student who leaves the country while a request for transfer is pending can travel using:

 

  The active Form I-20 from the transfer-out school if the return date is before the transfer release date

  An initial Form I-20 from the transfer-in school if the return date is after the transfer release date

Lesson 4:  Loss of Status and Reinstatements


Introduction


Nonimmigrant students fall out of status if they do not comply with the conditions of their respective visa statuses. Students can lose status for a variety of violations such as failing to enroll for a required session or working without authorization.

 

This lesson looks at the process for reinstatement of status. A student may apply for reinstatement of status in cases where the violation was outside of the student's control and the student continues to attend, or plans to attend, a program of study at an SEVP-certified school.

Topic 1: DSO Responsibilities


This topic outlines the ways in which a nonimmigrant student can lose status, how a student’s SEVIS record can be terminated, and describes the DSO’s recommendation process when a student requests reinstatement.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Understand how a SEVIS record can be terminated

  Understand when you should terminate a student’s SEVIS record

  Understand your role in the reinstatement of status process

Introduction


Nonimmigrant students fall out of status if they do not comply with the conditions of their respective visa statuses. Students can lose status for a variety of violations such as failing to enroll for a required session or working without authorization.

 

This lesson looks at the process for reinstatement of status. A student may apply for reinstatement of status in cases where the violation was outside of the student's control and the student continues to attend, or plans to attend, a program of study at an SEVP-certified school.

Termination Reasons in SEVIS

 

There are a number of termination reasons in SEVIS. The table below includes all termination reasons and provides examples of when each termination reason should be used.

 

When a nonimmigrant has a pending change of status, keep the SEVIS record in Initial status until the change of status is adjudicated. If necessary, defer the Program Start Date until the change of status is adjudicated. If a record is activated in error, use the corrections menu to make it Initial or ask for a data fix. Otherwise the person may have a terminated SEVIS record instead of a cancelled record. If a record is in initial status, and the nonimmigrant withdraws his or her change of status, cancel the record.

Adjustment of Status

 

When a nonimmigrant student files an Adjustment of Status (Form I-485) but maintains F-1 or M-1 status, the student’s SEVIS record should remain active until the adjustment is approved. The DSO should then manually terminate the record for Change of Status Approved. Note the circumstances in the remarks area and provide the student’s A-Number or Receipt Number.

 

Duplicate Records

 

When a student has two Active SEVIS records, the DSO would be required to submit a correction request to have the duplicate record set to canceled status. If you are unsure which record should be cancelled, you should consult with SEVP for guidance.

Approving Requests for Reinstatement

 

You are the first line of evaluation in considering a student’s request for reinstatement. There are no specific guidelines as to when you should or should not recommend reinstatement. However, keep in mind that the loss of status should be beyond the student's control. Use your discretion when recommending reinstatement.

 

Take the following steps to recommend reinstatement:

 

  Enter the recommendation on the Student Reinstatement Screen in the student’s SEVIS record

  Advise the student to send a complete request package to USCIS, including

Fee

Form I-20 with recommendation signed by DSO

Completed Form I-539

- All evidence required to support the request (for example, if a serious illness caused the violation by preventing enrollment, the packet must include a medical report)

 

You should advise students to:

 

  Keep a copy of the entire application for reinstatement packet

  Send the packet via registered/receipt requested mail or by courier

  Keep a copy of the canceled check submitted for the fee or use e-filing

  Comply with the requirements for maintaining student status

Topic 2: Student Activities While Pending Reinstatement


A nonimmigrant student is limited in the activities that he or she can pursue while an application is pending with USCIS. This topic outlines a student’s responsibilities and limitations while an application for reinstatement of status is pending.

 

After completing this topic, you will be able to:

 

  Understand what a student can and cannot do while an  application for reinstatement of status is pending

  Advise students on their responsibilities and limitations while an application for reinstatement of status is pending

While a request for reinstatement is pending with USCIS, the student:

 

  Can and should continue a full-time program of study at the school where they are enrolled

  Must comply with all the requirements for maintaining student status

  Should not travel outside the United States, as doing so will be considered an abandonment of the pending reinstatement application. If the student decides to do so, he or she will have to reenter on a new, initial attendance Form I-20 as well as pay the SEVIS fee

  Cannot work on or off campus

 

Out-of-status students are not eligible to apply for any student-related benefits while the reinstatement is pending.

Topic 3: Approval/Denial


Upon adjudication by USCIS, a student will either be reinstated to his or her lost status or the application will be denied and the student must immediately depart the United States. This topic covers each scenario.

 

After completing this Topic, you will be able to:

 

  Understand what action should be taken upon approval or denial of an application for reinstatement of status

  Understand how you are notified of the USCIS decision

  Advise students on what they are entitled to upon approval of the application for reinstatement of status

  Advise students on what they must do if an application for reinstatement of status is denied

If a student's request for reinstatement is approved:

 

  The student can receive a notice and Form I-20 with an approved stamp from USCIS or may merely receive the Form I-20 and the Form I-94, if it is required.

  You are notified by email, rather than the standard SEVIS alert method.

  You must check the session and program end dates that are currently active in the student's SEVIS record and make any required updates.

  The student is entitled to apply for student-related benefits.

 

If a student's request for reinstatement is denied:

 

  USCIS sends the student a notice of denial.

  The student must depart the United States immediately.

  You are notified by email, rather than by the standard SEVIS alert method.

 

There is no appeal process for the decision. However, the student can file a motion to reopen the case, if sufficient grounds exist. If a motion to reopen is filed, the student’s SEVIS record continues to indicate that the student has been terminated, and that the request for reinstatement has been denied.

Summary

Module 3 introduced requirements placed upon F-1 and M-1 students to maintain nonimmigrant status and covered DSO reporting requirements based on student actions. The module presented information on special circumstances related to maintenance of status and provided instructions for program extensions and reductions. Finally, the module covered loss of student status and the reinstatement process.