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Enforcement and Removal
08/02/2012

ICE deports Mexican national convicted of practicing medicine without a license

Subject is also wanted in Mexico for fraud

ICE deports Mexican national convicted of practicing medicine without a license
ICE deports Mexican national convicted of practicing medicine without a license

RENO, Nev. – A Mexican national convicted in Nevada for practicing medicine without a license, who is also wanted in his native country for fraud, was turned over to Mexican authorities Thursday by officers from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO).

Edgar Eduardo Orozco-Abundis, 41, was transported by ERO from Reno to San Diego, where he was repatriated at the Otay Mesa border crossing. Orozco is charged with criminal fraud in three separate warrants issued by Mexico's Attorney General in July 2010, December 2010 and April 2011.

Orozco's removal from the United States comes 10 months after he was encountered by ERO officers at the Washoe County Jail during a routine screening for criminal aliens. Further processing confirmed his identity and ERO officers subsequently received notification from the Mexican Attorney General's regional attaché that Orozco was wanted in Mexico on outstanding criminal warrants for fraud.

Orozco's incarceration in the Washoe County Jail followed his arrest on felony local charges for practicing medicine without a license and obtaining money under false pretenses. After encountering Orozco at the jail, ERO filed the paperwork placing him in deportation proceedings. On Sept. 26, 2011, an immigration judge granted Orozco's request to waive his right to an immigration hearing and receive a stipulated removal to Mexico.

Department of Homeland Security databases indicate Orozco was in the U.S. illegally. On July 18, Orozco's state criminal sentence was suspended and he was turned over to ERO for deportation.

"This case shows yet again the vital public safety benefit of the screenings ICE does at jails and prisons nationwide," said Steven Branch, field office director for ERO Nevada. "Thanks to enhanced technology and increased information sharing with our law enforcement partners, it's more and more difficult for international fugitives to elude justice by fleeing to the United States."

Since Oct. 1, 2009, ERO has removed 455 foreign fugitives from the United States who were being sought in their native countries for serious crimes, including kidnapping, rape and murder. ERO works with ICE's Office of International Affairs, foreign consular offices in the United States, and Interpol to identify foreign fugitives illegally present in the country.