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02/17/2017

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African American History Month Spotlight: HSI Cleveland ASAC Michael Moreland

African American History Month Spotlight: HSI Cleveland ASAC Michael Moreland

It was a major culture shock when U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Cleveland Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) Michael T. Moreland first joined the U.S. Army.

After all, it’s a long way from his hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, where he was stationed. But despite the early obstacles, Moreland had a successful 15-year Army career that opened the door to his current law enforcement career.

As Moreland reflects on African American History Month, he looks back in appreciation of how those in generations before him made sacrifices to make it possible for the opportunities of today.

According to Moreland, one of the things instilled in him at an early age while growing up in Pittsburgh was the value of family and the belief that family should stick together. To this day, they are still a tight-knit group, and with Moreland a quick two-hour drive away from Pittsburgh in Cleveland, he is able to spend a lot of time with the family, especially his daughter, during his time way from work. 

Moreland was named HSI Cleveland ASAC in 2015. He is currently on a four-month detail as (A)Unit Chief of the HSI Academy at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia.

As a leader within the agency, Moreland helps guide the next generation, just as it was done for him by his grandfather, and other African Americans in leadership that he has looked up to.  Moreland said that there are African American leaders within HSI such as HSI Executive Associate Director Peter T. Edge and HSI Philadelphia SAC Marlon Miller, which are examples for others to follow. Moreland also stressed that there are also African American role models within the ranks that are eager to share the knowledge and experience they gained in government service.

“I feel that same responsibility for anyone who is looking up to me. Of course for African Americans who are working for me, but I have that same feeling for any agent or employee no matter what the race,” Moreland said. “I would like to see a time when we as a people make up in our minds that opportunities are for every one and that we shouldn’t let a perception hold us back from pursuing our goals, dreams and hopes.”

Those dreams have come to reality in the form of a successful military career and a successful career within ICE. For Moreland, this is just the beginning.

“I never thought I would make it this far, but now that I’m here I feel like the sky’s the limit,” Moreland said.

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Last Reviewed/Updated: 02/21/2017