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Enforcement and Removal
09/01/2015

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Suspect in 1995 Mexico City aggravated homicide removed through El Paso

Suspect in 1995 Mexico City aggravated homicide removed through El Paso
Suspect in 1995 Mexico City aggravated homicide removed through El Paso

EL PASO, Texas — A Mexican fugitive wanted since 1995 for aggravated homicide in his home country was deported Friday by officers with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO).

Isaias Perez-Pineda, 43, was turned over to Mexican authorities at the top of El Paso’s Stanton International Bridge. Perez-Pineda is a suspect in the 1995 homicide of Juventino Rojas Sanchez, 33, in Mexico’s capital.

Perez-Pineda, whose aliases include “Gordo” and “Chay,” is originally from Veracruz, Mexico. On Feb. 6 and Feb. 7, 2000, he attempted to illegally enter the United States through Eagle Pass, Texas. Agents from U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Border Patrol arrested him and returned him to Mexico both times.

Ten years later, he illegally entered the United States again through Eagle Pass.  The next day Border Patrol agents arrested him, served him with a notice and order of expedited removal, and charged him with illegal entry. On Feb. 22, 2010, a U.S. district judge in Del Rio, Texas, convicted Perez-Pineda of illegal entry and sentenced him to 10 days in prison with credit for time served. He was removed through Del Rio, Texas, Feb. 25.

On July 29, 2015, Perez-Pineda again illegally entered the United States near Santa Teresa, New Mexico. Border Patrol agents arrested him the next day and served him with a notice of intent to reinstate his prior removal order. The U.S. Attorney’s Office accepted the case for federal prosecution.

On Aug. 11, Mexico’s Office of the Attorney General informed ERO El Paso about the arrest warrant for Perez-Pineda for aggravated homicide. The Attorney General of Mexico requested ERO’s assistance in turning him over to Mexican law enforcement officials at the time of his removal from the country.

A U.S. district judge in Las Cruces, New Mexico, convicted Perez-Pineda of illegal entry Aug. 24, and sentenced him to 25 days in prison with credit for time served. ICE took custody of him the same day. He was detained until Aug. 28, which is when he was removed to Mexico.

Since Oct. 1, 2009, ERO has removed more than 1,150 foreign fugitives from the United States who were sought in their native countries for serious crimes, including kidnapping, rape and murder. ERO works with the ICE Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Office of International Operations, foreign consular offices in the United States, and Interpol to identify foreign fugitives illegally present in the United States.

Since Oct. 1, 2009, ERO has removed more than 1,150 foreign fugitives from the United States who were sought in their native countries for serious crimes, including kidnapping, rape and murder. ERO works with the ICE Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Office of International Operations, foreign consular offices in the United States, and Interpol to identify foreign fugitives illegally present in the United States. Members of the public who have information about foreign fugitives are urged to contact ICE by calling the toll-free ICE tip line at 1 (866) 347-2423 or internationally at 001-1802-872-6199. They can also file a tip online by completing ICE’s online tip form.

ERO coordinates the removal of criminals, foreign fugitives and others ordered deported. Last year alone, ERO removed 315,943 individuals from the United States. ICE is focused on smart and effective immigration enforcement that prioritizes its resources based on those who pose the biggest threat to national security, border security and public safety. ICE’s civil enforcement efforts are based on priorities set by the Secretary of Homeland Security in November 2014.

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Last Reviewed/Updated: 09/02/2015